What is website remarketing?

What is website remarketing?

1. Google Adwords Google’s mission statement is to “organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful”.  One of the many Google programs is Adwords. Google AdWords is a paid digital marketing program (also known as Pay-per-click). It is very effective in many cases because it targets consumers that are interested in your product or service and search for more information. Google constantly improves their services and offers many innovative programs to connect businesses with their customers.  Google AdWords offers various types of marketing options including Remarketing. 2. What is Remarketing? Remarketing is a strategy to reach back to people who have visited your website or used your app. They see your ads as they browse websites that are part of the Google Display Network, or as they search online for terms related to your products or services. 3. How Adwords Remarketing works? Have you ever noticed that after you visit a website the ads from the website seem to follow you? That is a prime example of remarketing. Remarketing allows customers that are not quite ready to purchase your product to be reminded of their initial interest. For example, let’s say that a potential customer visits your website. Let’s say your website is a site that sells roller blades. A potential customer selects the pair of blades he  wants and is ready to order, however he gets distracted and goes to get lunch instead. After lunch he completely forgets about his interest in buying roller blades. The way remarketing works is it aims to remind him. Throughout the day, when he has other websites pulled up on his computer, it is likely he...
Google Changes Placement of PPC Ads on Results Pages: What this means for your Adwords campaign

Google Changes Placement of PPC Ads on Results Pages: What this means for your Adwords campaign

Last week, Google started rolling out the biggest change to the pay-per-click network (AdWords) ads we’ve seen in many years. The right column was removed and paid ads are now displayed on the top and bottom of the Google search engine results pages (SERPs). Clients have reached us with many questions: What happened? What does this mean for us?  How do we make the best of it? We are still waiting to see the full effect of the change but a couple of things are becoming clear for us. What happened with the Google ads on SERPs? No text ads will be served on the right side of the search results Google will serve four text ads instead of three in the mainline area above the organic listings Three text ads will show at the bottom of the Google SERPs The total number of text ads that can appear on a SERP will be reduced from 11 to a maximum of 7 What does the change in displaying ads on Google mean for us? Advertisers in position 1 and 2 may not see significant changes immediately. Advertisers in position 3 and 4 will experience the best impact. They will get more clicks for the same impressions Advertisers in 5-7 most probably will lose some visibility and clicks Advertisers on position 8+ will move to page 2. Ouch! This is the immediate impact. When it comes to the long term impact, it is clear that advertisers will have to increase their bids and pay more in order to get their ad on top of page 1 on Google. Reducing the amount...
Pay Per Click Advertising

Pay Per Click Advertising

If your business goals are: getting instant local and targeted traffic; increasing sales or leads; promoting seasonal products; branding; high ROI then Pay Per Click Advertising is right for you! After organic search engine optimization, pay-per-click or PPC is the most popular Internet marketing program. Each of the major search engines offers a PPC program. Google’s PPC program is called AdWords, Yahoo’s is called Yahoo! Marketing Solutions, and MSN has Microsoft AdCenter. There are also some secondary search engines offering PPC programs. Examples are Business.com and TripAdvisor.com. PPC is a program where ads or links to the advertiser’s website are displayed in the SERPs when visitors enter specific keywords. The advertiser pays only when a visitor clicks on the link. The cost per click (CPC) is set up by the advertiser via an interface the search engine provides. Typically monthly and daily budgets are used to help businesses control their costs. The actual CPC varies but has a minimum for each search engine. An example of how to calculate the ROI of a PPC campaign: Your budget per month is $5,000 with a $2 maximum CPC. Because you only pay for ad clicks and you set the maximum CPC, the website will receive at least 2,500 clicks. Your website may receive substantially more clicks at a lower CPC. If your website conversion rate is 10%, your business will make 250 sales as a result of the clicks. If the average sale amount is one hundred dollars, your business will have returned $25,000 in sales. Four steps to a successful PPC campaign: Identify your advertising goals, and then create relevant...